Archive for the ‘photographer’ Tag

No car, no problem.

1950's Greasemonkey

1950's Greasemonkey

I did another vintage male photoshoot on Sunday. I was really excited for this one because the model was supposed to borrow his brother-in-law’s beat-up old Cadillac. The car would have been perfect for my vintage mechanic concept.

Unfortunately, the car wound up being used by his brother-in-law at the last second so we had to improvise and use the model’s ultra modern Chevrolet instead.

My original idea for a location was also ditched once we got there and I realized it was way more ghetto than I remember it being. Contrary to popular belief, there is a big difference between a vintage-looking location and just a run-down background.

Luckily, we found a building around the corner that was perfect. It was the service entrance to a Honda dealership. There were no cameras and no street activity, so I gave it the greenlight so we setup shop.

Lighting with my small strobes was a challenge because I wanted to get a nice rim-light, but I also wanted to show the engine while also highlighting that cool gate. Once I figured out what I wanted to focus on, the rest came easy. I let the sun work as my third light, illuminating the engine just enough. I used the gate to my advantage, lighting it to provide an interesting shadow and just a little bit of bounce light for the right side of his face.

At the end of the day, we were sweaty, stinky and proud of what we had accomplished. Meanwhile, I was eyeing the abandoned warehouse across the street for a future shoot…

Erik Boker Photography


At first glance you’re disgusted and intrigued, then you it’s realize it’s a product you use everyday and … well, you just don’t know what to think now do you?

Regardless of your squeamish opinion there’s no doubt that Erik Boker is somewhat of a genius. Like Picasso, he juxtaposes things fucking with our mental expectations. Like Leonardo Da Vinci he is curious and cross-examines notions. Like Michelangelo he appreciates beauty, both natural and artificial. I may be exaggerating, but he’s got the awards to back up his ingenuity.

His portraits are also intriguing and excellently executed. He manages to capture the essence of his subjects, and he makes it seems so effortless.

Indulge in his work, it will inspire you.